On the clock, Patrick Joust, 36, is a librarian. Off the clock, he’s a self-taught photographer with a fascination of Baltimore at night. Video by Stokely Baksh.

oday’s front page and the sports section cover. Check out our full O’s coverage at http://www.baltimoresun.com/orioles.

oday’s front page and the sports section cover. 

Check out our full O’s coverage at http://www.baltimoresun.com/orioles.

Since 2011, the city has paid about $5.7 million over allegations of police brutality, a 6-month investigation by Baltimore Sun reporter Mark Puente found. Explore the payouts. 
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Baltimore Sun front pages after Orioles’ division titles

They appear in long-vacant buildings and carefully tended structures. Seeds dispersed by wind and birds take root, needing only water, sun and a pinch of soil. The trees are reminders that Baltimore was once a forest, and, if the trees had their way, would become one again.

The  story of the trees that try to take over: http://bsun.md/1A5ntz8.

Pictured, the 1800 block of N. Charles Street, above Station North Cafe. By Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun)

Alright, Baltimore/DMV: We follow some pretty great photographers, but we want to know your favorites
And, we want to tell the Baltimore (and beyond) #photography community about them. Over on our blog, The Darkroom, we want to feature area photographers who are doing something special, original or just phenomenal, but we know there are some great photographers out there that we don’t know about.
Who are your favorites? Let us know.

Alright, Baltimore/DMV: We follow some pretty great photographers, but we want to know your favorites

And, we want to tell the Baltimore (and beyond) #photography community about them. Over on our blog, The Darkroom, we want to feature area photographers who are doing something special, original or just phenomenal, but we know there are some great photographers out there that we don’t know about.

Who are your favorites? Let us know.

Jack Barakat of All Time Low, the pop-punk quartet from Towson, recently became a co-owner of the Fells Point bar.

More than 100 former Playboy Bunnies will be converging on Baltimore this weekend for a semi-annual reunion. The women worked as waitresses and hostesses in the old Playboy clubs, which were once a fixture in most large cities.
The women worked in low-cut satin leotards, bunny ears and fuzzy tails, which were handed out by a “Bunny Mother.”
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the opening of Baltimore’s Playboy club, which closed in 1977.

More than 100 former Playboy Bunnies will be converging on Baltimore this weekend for a semi-annual reunion. The women worked as waitresses and hostesses in the old Playboy clubs, which were once a fixture in most large cities.

The women worked in low-cut satin leotards, bunny ears and fuzzy tails, which were handed out by a “Bunny Mother.”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the opening of Baltimore’s Playboy club, which closed in 1977.

#onlyinbaltimore, via @t_roachdubv on Twitter.
Baltimore’s most distinctive bus stop was unveiled late last month on the side of the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The trio of giant letters — which resemble a set piece from ”Sesame Street” — has become a favorite spot for residents to lounge or pose for photos.
"It’s hit-you-over-the-head simple, but a really elegant idea," said Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, an organizer of the project, which brought European artists to a transit stop in each of the city’s three arts districts. The initiative was funded with a $130,000 grant from the European Union National Institutes for Culture and $200,000 from ArtPlace America, Gilmore said.

Baltimore’s most distinctive bus stop was unveiled late last month on the side of the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The trio of giant letters — which resemble a set piece from ”Sesame Street” — has become a favorite spot for residents to lounge or pose for photos.

"It’s hit-you-over-the-head simple, but a really elegant idea," said Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, an organizer of the project, which brought European artists to a transit stop in each of the city’s three arts districts. The initiative was funded with a $130,000 grant from the European Union National Institutes for Culture and $200,000 from ArtPlace America, Gilmore said.

Was it Big Kahuna? That’s just a guess after seeing a video of a shark circling a boat off the coast of Ocean City that was posted online by University of Maryland student Aaron Caplan.

Caplan said he was fishing on July 30 about 6 miles off shore when a great white shark became curious about his boat. He estimated the shark was about 13-15 feet.

Misha Collins, plays the complex angel, Castiel, on the CW show “Supernatural.” 

He’s a bit of a real-life angel, organizing the “Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen" (AKA #GISHWHES) for the past four years.

But when the first contestants arrived at Roland Park Place retirement home bearing cards and flowers, residents and staff weren’t sure what to make of them.

Then it became clear: they were participants in an international scavenger hunt, organized by the grandson of a resident, Mrs. Doris Tippens, to visit. 

Is J.O. Spice the red-headed but incredibly popular stepchild of crab spices?
If the crabs came from one of the area’s carryout restaurants or crab houses, more than likely the seasoning isn’t the iconic Old Bay. Chances are, it’s a seasoning mix produced in an industrial park off Sulphur Spring Road.
This is no McCormick with its giant campus in Hunt Valley and hundreds of employees. J.O. Spice Co. on Old Georgetown Road is still family run and employs a couple dozen people to produce seafood seasoning, as well as a whole line of products to spice up meat, fish and poultry.

Is J.O. Spice the red-headed but incredibly popular stepchild of crab spices?

If the crabs came from one of the area’s carryout restaurants or crab houses, more than likely the seasoning isn’t the iconic Old Bay. Chances are, it’s a seasoning mix produced in an industrial park off Sulphur Spring Road.

This is no McCormick with its giant campus in Hunt Valley and hundreds of employees. J.O. Spice Co. on Old Georgetown Road is still family run and employs a couple dozen people to produce seafood seasoning, as well as a whole line of products to spice up meat, fish and poultry.

Last night there was a sense that maybe, finally, more magical Baltimore Orioles moments are coming. 
It’s baaaaaaack

After each Ravens game, photo editors put together a “Rough Cut” over on our visual journalism blog, The Darkroom. It’s a loose edit from The Baltimore Sun’s photographic coverage of the National Football League. Fanatic fans, marching bands, cheerleaders and lots of game action are just part of the spectacle that is the NFL.

This week, photojournalists Kenneth K. Lam, Al Drago and Rachel Woolf photographed the Ravens as they beat the San Francisco 49ers 23-3 during Thursday’s pre-season game at M&T Bank Stadium.